How to Become a Digital Nomad and Work Remotely in 2020

How to Become a Digital Nomad and Work Remotely in 2020

 
According to a recent Buffer report, 99% of people would love to work remotely. When you’re working as a digital nomad, there’s no one to tell you when you should take vacations and when you should work. However, being the owner of your time comes with responsibilities and you’ll also have to be the one that makes sure you stay productive. You’ll have to say good-bye to procrastination and distractions, especially when working from home. Digital nomads can struggle to create an effective work schedule because their daily activities look like a puzzle, with multiple airplane or train schedules that aren’t always accurate. But, this is something you need to think about if you’re considering becoming a digital nomad as the world continues its gradual reopening. However, despite the crazy schedules and uncertainty, digital nomads still have many benefits that make it very appealing. Here we’ll show you how you can become a digital nomad and land a remote job.

Why you should become a Digital Nomad

Being a digital nomad allows you to travel when you please and get paid while doing so. This is the most appealing aspect for those who want to become a digital nomad. There are also many opportunities to work online. Companies today minimize expenses related to having a physical environment like offices so they can allocate resources to something that brings more revenue. They also save money from utility expenses because there are fewer people at the office that need electricity. This makes hiring remotely appealing to certain companies.

If you’re on retirement and still want to make some money, being a digital nomad will allow you to extend your career a couple of years more. It’s never too late to go visit your dream locations and natural paradises.

Browse Remote Job Listings for Career Ideas

Before you dive into the ocean of remote work, you should consider what type of job would make you happy. You will also need to think about the salary. Many high-paying jobs allow you to work remotely. This will depend on the skills you already have, and if you feel that you don’t have any skill for the type of job you want, you can always learn through a bootcamp. Here are some of the highest-paying jobs for digital nomads.
 
  • Software Engineering: Software engineering consists of developing digital products like software or applications by using programming languages. Some of the most common programming languages are JavaScript, Python, and C++. Do you have any idea of how important a software developer is in a company? A Stripe and Harris report revealed that 70% of a company’s sales success depends on its software developer. As a user, we usually make our opinions of any company based on the quality of its platform, whether it is a website or an app.
 
  • UX/UI Designers: UX and UI designers create better user experiences in digital products such as websites or applications. These two professions are a mix of designing and programming skills. That’s why software developers and UX designers usually work shoulder-to-shoulder. UX is related to functionality and UXdesigners research and test products to improve user experience.UI takes care of the quality of the interface, from the voice commands to the keyboards. UX designers make up to $113,000. If you’re trying to learn this skill, you can go for Thinkful’s UX and UI boot camps. Thinkful offers flexible payment methods that go from deferred tuition to loan financing payment.
 
  • Digital Marketing: Digital Marketing is different from traditional marketing despite what most people think. Digital marketing is related to SEO, YouTube, and social media platforms, such as Instagram or Facebook. Most companies are allocating their resources on digital marketing rather than the traditional ones because users and customers today spend more time on their phones and computers rather than watching TV. Digital marketers can make $85,000 in a yearly salary. General Assembly’s digital marketing bootcamp is a good option if you’re trying to learn this skill. This course teaches you everything from audience segmentation to the best strategies to implement in digital marketing strategies.
 
If you would like to become a digital nomad and are interested in learning new skills to do so, check out Career Karma for bootcamps on learning new and relevant skills. You could also check out our resources page for more information on remote work.
 
 

Written by Artur Meyster from Career Karma.

How working remotely lowers your environmental footprint

How working remotely lowers your environmental footprint

 

Earth Day 2020

 

2020 is shaping up to be a year for the history books, and after only a few months. The current narrative is engulfed by the ramifications of the novel coronavirus. Peoples’ lives have been upended in every corner of the world. Millions of jobs were lost overnight, entire industries have been forced to shut down indefinitely, and millions of medical professionals have put themselves at risk to help those in need. While messages of fear and uncertainty continue to occupy the media, there is a silver lining: the rapid improvement in the health of our planet from us working remotely.

Who would have thought that on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, the waters of Venice would be clear, oil would have momentarily become worthless, and the people of India would be able to see the peaks of the Himalayas for the first time in decades?

The social fabric on which we used to rely has, at least partially, unravelled. At the same time, working remotely has never been more widespread, and we’re healing our planet in the process.

Changes to the way we eat

 

There are 3 major contributors to our impact on the planet: food, water, and energy. None of them operate independently from one another. They are all critical components of the massive, complex system that we call home: our planet, Earth.

Our global food system is one of the heaviest sources of greenhouse gas emissions. It has a tremendous impact on the environment, yet it is only beginning to emerge in the global discussion on sustainability. Estimates of the food system’s contribution to greenhouse gas emissions range anywhere from 20% to 37%. We lose and/or waste a staggering third of all the food we produce. But cooking at home can help, and it is a trend we have seen skyrocketing as a result of the coronavirus lockdowns.

This is not to say that we should stop eating out at restaurants. We love to support the local culinary establishments. After all, it is one of, if not, the main reason many of us (used to) travel. But they need not be mutually exclusive. Cooking at home can affect our decisions around when, where, and why we eat out. In many ways, cooking at home allows us to appreciate just how much love and work goes into the food we eat out.

There are so many benefits to cooking your own food at home. Not only is it less expensive, it is often healthier, it creates less waste and more leftovers. Besides, you are probably a better chef than you imagine. Start with the basics and experiment. It’s one of those skills that you never forget and will always be useful.

Changing the way we eat is critical to a healthier planet in the future. As we look to one another for connection in the wake of the coronavirus, cooking for friends and family is one of the easiest and most fulfilling ways to come together and share, both a meal, and time together. We can change the landscape for the future of food, and in the process, the health of our planet. So keep up your home-cooking habit!

A Quickly-Changing Office Landscape

 

All of a sudden people were told to start working remotely. A policy that was the stuff of legends to many office workers only months ago has since become mandatory. It is quickly becoming the norm. Remote work was already on the rise before the coronavirus outbreak. The recent lockdown measures have since accelerated this trend and many of the changes are expected to be permanent.

Companies that are quick to adapt to this new reality are likely to find improvements to both their bottom line and employee productivity. At the same time, it is one of the cheapest ways for a company to reduce their carbon footprint. It’s a rare win-win-win situation, for employers, employees, and the environment.

Xerox has been employing remote workers for 30 years. They are a prime example of the environmental benefits that can be reaped from remote teams. More than 8,600 of their employees work remotely. In 2016 they reduced vehicle miles driven by an estimated 99 million, reduced gasoline consumption by 4.9 million gallons, and avoided more than 43,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions.
All these changes benefit the employees as well, by allowing them to save more money, and by providing a better work-life balance. In fact, a Global Analytics survey suggests that 24% of employees say they would take up to a 10% pay cut to benefit the environment.

Our buildings use a tremendous amount of energy to keep us comfortable while we toil away. Heating, cooling, and lighting need vast amounts of power. Add to that the carbon cost of putting a building together and you have a recipe for a lot of environmental stress. In 2017 the UN estimated that our buildings contributed to over 36% of our energy consumption. Companies have found many ways to reduce the carbon footprint of their office spaces. From improvements to how we build, to how we use energy, our office buildings continue to improve. But, perhaps the simplest way is to simply get rid of the office as we know it. Besides, ‘keeping the lights on’ won’t be so much of a worry.

Changes to How We Use Land

 

Whether you attribute the carbon footprint of a commute to the commuter or the company is up for debate. One thing is clear: less commuting is better for everyone. Commuters spend less time in traffic. They can spend more time with their friends and family. Their mental health improves. Cities experience less congestion, and thus pollution decreases. We have seen the drastic impact that traffic has on our cities in recent months. Cleaner air enables us to lead healthier, happier lives. It also reduces the burden on our health systems. Traffic accidents drop and our roadways need less maintenance. The list goes on.

Major cities around the world are becoming prohibitively expensive for many people. Naturally, people are finding ways to move to lower-cost places nearby. Working remotely is, of course, one of the best ways to change where you live, while keeping your job. It is one of the reasons it has become so popular. But there is another trend on the rise as well: the super-commuter. Defined as someone who travels more than 180 miles to get to work, super-commuting too, could see a rise in adoption once the ramifications of the coronavirus have normalized.

Face-to-face meetings are still important and many people swear by them. Will the remote workers of the future have to ‘super-commute’ for that especially important meeting? Will they factor these decisions into where they live?

Either way, the new work landscape will be much different in the future. People’s decisions about where they live will be less governed by where they work, and more so, by what they value in a city. Cities, and small towns alike, will have to adapt as they try to attract or retain citizens. Cities and towns will be inclined to adopt environmentally-friendly policies, so long as we value the environment in which we live.
We have seen the colossal changes that we need to make to restore our natural environment. But we know now that it is possible. Believing that our goals are achievable is half the battle. We have witnessed a global response to a global problem, and there will be more to come. When we look back on these moments, let us remember what we are capable of.

As of this writing 106 countries have formally stated their commitment to enhancing their national climate commitments by the end of the year. Our planet needs our help. Staying at home might, once again, be a simple and effective solution.

How exciting.

JRD

If you want to learn more about how to effectively work from anywhere, be sure to subscribe for our updates and check out our resources. We are always available to answer your questions about working remotely.

How to Stay Motivated During Turbulent Times

How to Stay Motivated During Turbulent Times

 

A Global Lockdown

We are living in extraordinary times. The world has come to a standstill in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This pandemic has created unique challenges for our global society, and for most of us, it is the first time we’ve ever experienced a global lockdown. We all have a part to play in tackling this crisis. Physical distancing and staying indoors have helped to stop the spread of this virus. At the same time, it is easy to feel suffocated, overwhelmed, anxious, or flat out unmotivated. We all go through ups and downs and many of us are taking things day by day. That is okay. Here are some ways you can stay motivated as you navigate the bumpy road ahead.

Start with Reflection

It’s not easy dealing with this situation. We all led our own, individual lives in the days leading up to lockdown measures enacted around the world. As nations responded to the rapid spread of COVID-19, we had to come together as one global community. With the dramatic changes to our social conditions, it’s easy for us to feel unmotivated. To start, reflect on your life, as it was, a few months ago. Did you have a job that you went to every day? Did you move to a new city or country and immerse yourself in a new culture? Were you running a business or starting a freelancing journey? It may feel like it’s been a while, and for some it has, so take a moment to reflect, and remember how far you have come. Visualise what your day to day life was like. Recall the emotions that you felt as you lived it. Do your best to recall experiences that created both positive and negative emotions. Write them down. Record each memory and the emotion that you’ve associated with these memories. Identify the activities in your daily life that made you feel good or bad. Your positive experiences could include:
 
  • your daily interactions with your work colleagues
 
  • discovering new cultures and places during your travels
 
  • the day you closed a big deal with a new client or customer
 
While your negative experiences might include:
 
  • the monotony of a daily commute
 
  • a particularly distracting colleague
 
  • your most time-consuming client and/or customer
 
We are now in a new state of normal. Identify your positive experiences, and then focus on those actions that will bring more of these experiences to your life. Identify your negative experiences, and determine what you can do to minimize or eliminate the root of these experiences. If you dread your daily commute, try negotiating for a remote work policy (now might be the best time).

Define Your Goals and Quantify Them 

One of the most important factors when setting a goal is to make sure that it genuinely interests you. Goals have to be important and provide value to you. Otherwise, the chances of you achieving them are low. Take a look back at your experiences. What are the common underlying themes that generated a specific emotion?

Reflect on Your Positive Experiences

Create goals around how you can enjoy more of your positive experiences in the midst of this new normal. If you feel a need to stay connected to colleagues whose company you value, reach out to a few of them and set up a weekly call. Find a colleague you are already close with and talk to someone you want to get closer to. If you enjoy interacting with select clients that make you feel valued, set up a weekly feedback call. Do not make the purpose of the call to sell more of your products or services. Use it as a touch-point to enhance the relationship. If you enjoy immersing yourself in new cultures and places, make a list of the countries or cities you want to visit when the opportunity is available again. Then make a point to learn more about those countries and cities, as though you were already on your way.

Reflect on Your Negative Experiences

Create goals around how to reduce or eliminate the negativity in your life. If you find that certain colleagues are distracting or undermining your work, start by tracking how much time you spend with them. Then find ways to reduce the time you spend interacting with them by 5%-10% each week over the next month. There are many ways to do this, and it’s probably even easier right now:
 
  • schedule a quick voice call instead of an in-person, or video meeting
 
  • have meeting agendas prepared, so that your meetings are quicker and to the point.
 
  • just ignore them for a day (this may be difficult to do, depending on the person, but you might be surprised by how little some people notice it).
 
If you find that certain clients are using up far more of your time than you think it’s worth, cut them loose. It can be hard to turn down a client. After all, they are the person paying you, so try using the 80/20 rule. Do you have clients that are always negotiating prices, or asking for refunds and chargebacks? Establish which 20% of your clients cause 80% of your problems, and stop working with them. Use the time instead to find a new, amazing client, who doesn’t waste your time.

Next Steps 

Goal setting is only the start of your new journey. Once you write down your goals, check-in with yourself weekly. Check to see that you’re actually meeting these goals, or where you might be falling short. Falling short could mean:
 
  • That you’ve set very aggressive goals for an unreasonably short period of time
 
  • That the goals themselves are unfeasible
 
  • That you may need to re-evaluate your motivations for setting the goal in the first place.
 
It’s crucial to point out that the goals you are setting for yourself should focus on improving your happiness. Try to avoid focusing on material pursuits. Center your focus on developing the habits that further your career, generate more business, or expand your network.
 
We are big advocates of using goal setting to stay motivated during uncertain times, now, and in the future. They are one of the best ways to keep your mind occupied, and will continually fuel your desire to improve your livelihood, however you define it.
 
There is a silver lining to every hardship. Never stop looking for it, no matter how tough it gets. It’s unlikely that we will get another opportunity to take a step back and reflect on our lives as deeply as we can right now. Let us continue to play our part as we work through this crisis, but let’s also do our best to enjoy it while we can.
 
Cheers,

CV

The Best Chrome Extensions to Boost Your Digital Productivity

The Best Chrome Extensions to Boost Your Digital Productivity

Google Chrome itself is becoming a desktop environment as we continue to use more cloud software, just look at ChromeOS. We all work from our laptops. As individuals who work remotely, we make a living by typing on, talking at, or otherwise manipulating the 1s and 0s of our computers, and subsequently sending this information to one, or many other people. By and large, we are information workers. Some of you perhaps, lucky or not, are able to make a living solely by speaking with people over the phone (can you please let us in on your secret recipe?).

Oftentimes, many of us don’t give our computer environments the consideration they deserve. Not only do our livelihoods depend these magical devices, our species is spending a startling proportion of our time with them

For many of us, a large part of our screen time is spent in the Google Chrome web browser, (or the Chromium web browser for the free-open-source-software fans). Maybe you begin your day by opening a fresh, crisp, new Chrome window, or maybe, like me, you begin in of one of far too many open tabs: email, and Google sheets, and Google docs, and Slack, in both a browser tab and a separate application window, and Facebook, and that random photo that you’ve now forgotten why you looked it up in the first place, and that email thread from your mom that you sent to your work email so that you could draft a response, and…

For those of you that work in Chrome on the regular, or any other web browser for that matter, please remember that it is your digital office space. It is meant to be a sanctuary for your digital focus, an oasis for your productivity. Please treat it as such. Set it up in a way that makes you want to use it, where building your dreams in any other web browser becomes a pointless exercise in mundanity.

Trust me when I tell you it will happen, because it happened to me, and all with the help what I consider the best Chrome extensions:

The Motion Chrome Extension

motion chrome extension logo

motion chrome extension productivity panel

Motion is the ultimate companion in your daily battle against procrastination. It is an extension to lean on when times are tough and you can’t think of how you could possibly get that tiny little to-do done with all these social feeds blaring in your face. It’s the simplicity of the extension that really puts it in a league of its own. No learning curve, no “hey, check out these cool features!”; just a simple, beautiful little extension that gently reminds you to stop getting in your own way, and just get it done already.

I know there are others. I’ve tried Rescuetime, I’ve tried Webtime Tracker, I’ve listened to the siren song of productivity prophets far and wide. None comes close to the simple elegance of Motion.

Oh, how I love elegant solutions. All the others I’ve tried have their respective learning curves, each with its own particular flavour of confusion or frustration, but not Motion. Motion is there for me when I need it most, minding it’s business when I’m minding mine, and gently reminding me how much longer I can watch that completely irrelevant Youtube video, when I need a break. It warns me when I try to meander too far from my work and allows me to easily see how I spend my time in clean, succinct reports:

motion chrome extension productivity dashboard

This is only the beginning of Motion. We hear there is a paid plan in the works with lots more super cool features. What more could we ask for?

The CLUT Chrome Extension – Cycle Last Used Tab

CLUT chrome extension logo

For those of you that don’t know, you can cycle through your chrome tabs using Ctrl and any of the numbers 1 through 9.

Ctrl + 1 through 8 will point you to each of your first eight tabs
Ctrl + 9 will point you to the last tab in a browser window.
If you, like me, have 20-odd browser tabs open (as of this writing I have 56 open, and yes, I know this is a problem), these functions, while useful, will serve you no purpose. You will be lucky if numbers 1 through 8 get through your pinned tabs, while 0 points you to your most recent distraction. Enter CLUT. Are you familiar with the Alt(Cmd)-Tab shortcut?

It’s that wonderful shortcut that brings you back to the last thing you were working on. Chrome to Slack and back in a flash! CLUT is the Alt(Cmd)-Tab replica for Chrome. Not only will it get you back to Slack in a flash, there are additional functions for skimming through your tabs:

Alt + W: Quick switch
Use for rapid switching to the last tab (by pressing once) or to the second to last used tab (by pressing rapidly twice).

Alt + S: Normal switch
Use when you want to look for a tab recently used but when you would want to go in a slower pace

Alt + Shift + S: Normal switch (in opposite direction)

And you can even change the shortcut keys if you want! (I very much recommend that you do not change it to Alt(Cmd)-Tab)

The LastPass Chrome Extension

LastPass logo

LastPass may have saved me my sanity. I manage somewhere around 250 passwords. Some are my personal passwords, some are for friends and family, and others still are passwords that I continue to manage for previous clients. It is an amazing service. I don’t think I could work in the cloud effectively without it. My old system consisted of roughly 10 variations of 10 of different ‘master’ passwords, depending on the necessary level of security:

password, Password, Password2020, P4ssw0rd2020, P4$w0rd2020!, etc…

I was resetting a different password at least once a week. It was incredibly frustrating, so I tried LastPass and the rest is history. I have to admit that I am still frustrated by the mobile app (though not enough by any means that I plan to stop using it), but the LastPass desktop Chrome extension is a UX masterpiece. If that’s not enough, all your passwords can look like this:

!82de8JEa^&N5qGfil%@o7dIXR

And you will never get them wrong.

This newfound password security will give you the peace of mind that you might find enjoying a glass of wine….overlooking a French vineyard…at sunset. Niiiiice.

Cheers,
JRD

We’ll be posting a more in depth rundown of LastPass here shortly, along with some other fun software to help you make the most of your new work-from-home life. Stay tuned.

How an Unconventional Career Enables This Woman to Travel

At Behere, we’re constantly inspired by the amazing women in our community. We’re thrilled to feature some of their stories and share how they’ve made traveling while working possible. From unconventional roles, to starting businesses abroad, these women have made exploring new places a priority. They share their biggest learnings, favorite memories, and advice for someone thinking about traveling more.

Today’s community feature, Katherine McCombs, has a rather unconventional career. She runs a circus – in Dubai – we’re not kidding. This energetic woman spends half a year managing a circus of performers from around the world in Dubai. The other 6 months she spends in NYC. This summer she decided to spend one of those months in Barcelona. Read more about her unique lifestyle below!

You have a very interesting job, can you share more about what you do for work?

unconventional career“I’m very lucky that my work is rather unusual. Six months of the year I work at a theme park in Dubai, as the Circus General Manager, or as I was more often called, the Mother of Clowns. I handle everything from running the show and daily schedules, to the venue details including repairs, security and the general public. It’s hands-on, a lot of work and wildly fun. I come back with nearly unbelievable stories and strange tan lines. That along with immense gratitude that I can take the other six months at a slower pace, doing one-off events, writing, and house managing at a theatre in NYC.”

Can you share some of your favorite memories from your travels?

“My favorite memories always involve food! I joke the reason I travel is to eat my way across the world. While living in Barcelona for the month, I took a side trip to Mallorca. There, I was brought to a friend’s neighborhood bar where she and her friends insisted I sample all the local favorites while flamenco music was played by the owner. It’s still my favorite night and some of the best food I had in Spain.

Or my friend’s invitation to celebrate Vishu (South Indian celebration of the completion of Spring Equinox). There I was given a sari and enjoyed a traditional feast, eating with my fingers and praying I wouldn’t drop curry on myself.

I love how food brings groups of people together no matter their backgrounds. It’s the one thing we all have in common.”

How has Behere helped you on this journey?

“Behere is an amazing resource! I’ve been telling everyone about it since I found them on Instagram. After a few misjudged living situations in my past, I do get nervous about traveling alone as a small woman in unknown areas. But not enough to stop doing it. Behere takes so much of that worry off of my shoulders. I know it was a woman who chose the apartment and neighborhood, and that makes a difference.

It was also amazing to have Meesen as a city host, and friend, to introduce me to other women and show me her favorite places. Knowing there’s someone local who you can trust if you have a problem was an incredible stress relief (and my mother was also a fan). Everything was so easy. All I had to do was arrive and everything I needed to succeed in Barcelona was waiting for me thanks to Behere.”

Park Guell

 

Can you share your #1 piece of advice for someone who’s thinking about traveling long-term?

“Do it! Just take the plunge and go. I went back and forth for nearly a year about going to Barcelona before I booked the trip through Behere and am still kicking myself for wasting the time. I chose to go freelance so I could have more freedom to live the life I wanted. Yet here I was, only going where work took me and not taking the time to see the places I have always wanted to see. You never know what can happen if you book that trip, send that email, or strike up a conversation with that stranger. I answered a Facebook post and wound up getting my dream job in Dubai. Literally, anything can happen if you want it to and put it into the universe.

Also if you’re traveling, do your research and invest in good luggage! I had a cheap suitcase that I traveled with and the wheel jammed as I arrive for my flight at JFK. My first night in the UK was spent using a penknife to try and fix it. I do not recommend this. Make sure the wheels will last (or have a good replacement warranty!). Also make sure anything you’re carrying on your back is designed well and won’t put you at risk for injury if/when you over pack it. (On the injury note, travel insurance! You might not need it, but you do not want to be without it if you do, especially if it’s a long term trip.) I’ve become so hugely into researching luggage and travel gear, it’s become a banned topic at the dinner table.”


Feeling the need for adventure? Learn more about how Behere can help make it a reality. Check out our locations below!

Words and images by Katherine McCombs.

How to Convince your Boss to Let you Work Remotely

Remote work is a dream for many, but convincing your boss you should work remotely might not be. To make it easier, we’ve put together a list of the key benefits for both you, and your employer, in addition to our helpful Resources page. Our strategies and benefits to asking for flexible work we’re featured in Forbes, so we’d say they’re pretty effective.

For those that aren’t sure if remote work is for them, we’re here for you too. We share five reasons (backed by research) that remote work is so helpful. Despite this, we know remote work isn’t for everyone as some people need that office environment. Often though a healthy balance can make a world of difference.

So, here are some top reasons for you to kick your daily commute to the curb… 

  • Remote Workers are 20% More Productive

    • Yes, remote workers are more productive than those that don’t work remotely. This is largely due to time that’s wasted with interruptions and meetings in an office environment. What’s more, employees that work remotely are twice as likely to work more than 40 hours a week on important tasks. Stress the important tasks because remote workers are able to identify and work more productively on tasks that really make a difference.
  • Remote Work Saves Your Company Big Bucks

    • Office space is expensive, as are office supplies, equipment, and events. Companies can save on average $11,000 a year for each flexible workers. That’s a lot of money that can go towards benefits, product / service improvements or more. Also, more than half of professionals have left a company or considered leaving because it lacked flexibility and turnover costs companies a ton each year. By lowering the rate of turnover, and having people working remotely companies can save hundreds of thousands each year.
  •  Flexibility Creates More Loyal Employees

    • Loyalty means higher productivity and decreased turnover (more $$ savings). As mentioned above, turnover is a huge issue for companies around the world. By having flexibility in your company, employees are more likely to want to work there and feel loyal to your organization.
  • Remote Workers are Healthier and Happier

    • Healthier employees are more productive employees. On average, remote workers take less sick and personal days because they have that flexibility of working remotely. Additionally, the average commute is half-hour, which is about the same time it takes people to run three miles
  •  Remote Workers are Inspired & Refreshed by a Change of Scenery and Adventure

    • Working remotely means you have the ability to travel, while still working. Being away from the office, especially in a new city, allows for fresh perspectives. It also helps with increased creativity, new ideas, and new experiences. Remote workers should take advantage of that opportunity as much as possible continue fueling their creativity and innovation. An important thing to note as a traveling remote worker though is to not move too quickly. Staying in a new place for at least a month ensures you can be settled and productive. When moving more often than it’s easy to get burnt out.

To help sell your boss on the idea, suggest trying a remote work month during a slow period at the office. If you want to start even smaller, suggest a remote workday once per week. This will help to ease into it and show the benefits, like increased productivity. Then asking for a month remote will be a lot easier to swing!


For more tips on convincing your boss to let you work remotely, head to our Resources page

7 Experts Share Their Tips to Balance Work and Travel

Despite seeming like a dream, balancing work and travel can quickly become overwhelming. From finding the right remote job, to managing your new found freedom with travel, it’s not an easy task. But one that is well worth it – our amazing community is proof.

At Behere, we’re always looking for tips to making it easier. That’s why our team sought out some of the experts to find out their best work and travel tips. These women have found a way to work and travel with balance. Their offices have been in airports, parks, cafes and restaurants, around the world and they know a thing or two about working on the go. From creative industries, to technical ones, there’s so many roles that can be done on the go. The key is to find that all too challenging ‘balance‘.

martina martian

Martina Martian: Artist & Creative

“My top tip for working while traveling is to always figure out how many hours you need in the week to get your work done but be flexible about when those hours are! Leave room for spontaneity and new plans- we are lucky not to have to stick to a schedule.” –  @martinamartian & martinamartian.com

 

Lauren Meeker: Founder, Photographer & Content Creator

“Go slowly – spend at least one month in each place and bounce around less. When you have the freedom to be working from anywhere in the world, you can sometimes feel like you need to be everywhere at once, seeing everything and going everywhere, always taking full advantage of this incredible opportunity. But making a conscious effort to spend at least a month in each place you travel will give you enough time to get into a healthy routine in each location, and help you stay productive while working around the world.” – @splorinlauren & voyageandventure.com

 

travel and work tips

Carrie Mitchell: Writer, Author & Creative

“Invest in a digital work management platform (like Bonsai) and apps that can help you organize and stick to your project timelines while you are traveling. Having reminders and everything in one place is a lifesaver.” – @carrieamitchell

 

Meesen Brown

Meesen Brown: Founder & CEO

“When I started working while traveling, I quickly learnt the key for my productivity is being prepared, before I arrive. This means booking an apartment that has home comforts, in a safe area, finding a coworking space with good community, and booking fitness classes or finding a running route. Doing these in advance allow me to actually enjoy the new city I’m in, and get my work done. Plus it saves me tons of time and headaches.” – @meesenb & gobehere.com

 

bucketlist bombshells


Cassie & Shay: Online Course Creators

“Be intentional about maintaining a routine on the road — we love to create a new schedule that adjusts with each location we’re in. It allows us to create routines, practice self-care and be the best version of ourselves for our business!”   – @bucketlistbombshells

 

work and travel tips


Roota: Marketing Expert & Freelancer

“If you’d like to travel while making a full-time income, I recommend you learn well paying marketing skills. Those skills will help you land high-ticket clients who are happy to pay for your services. I’ve scaled my online business this way for 2 years and have been able to make a comfortable full-time income out of it. There are tons of online courses which help you fast track the above process for you. Enrol in one, work hard to implement your knowledge and know that the remote work lifestyle really is possible!” – @i_am_roota

 

freelancer


Cassy Martinez: Entrepreneur & Freelancer

“As a digital freelancer and entrepreneur, I work on projects from anywhere in the world with good wifi. When I’m on the road, one of my favorite things to do in is Google “Best wifi cafes in _____.” Each day, I pack up my backpack, hit up a local cafe and bang out a couple hours of quality work, rewarding myself with a taste of the city afterward. Exploring each new destination and switching up work environments keeps me stimulated and inspired to bring forth my best work and tackle projects that I had put on hold previously.” – @cassyymartinez, @weareladylab & weareladylab.com

These ladies tips will help you find your balance, and enjoy your work and travel lifestyle. Be sure to let them know on Instagram if you use any of their tips!


Thinking about taking the leap to work and travel? Use the above tips and stay productive using Behere! Get started below.

 

Traveling for Work? Here’s How to Stay Healthy & Productive

If you’ve taken one of the 465 million business trips in the US last year, you’re probably familiar with the hassles that come with traveling for work. The headaches of being in a new city and having to familiarize yourself with and figure everything out.

You may have experienced a lot of wasted time, delays, searching for a place to stay, dealing with unreliable wifi and uncomfortable or unsatisfactory accommodation. You might’ve skipped the hotel gym or craved a home cooked meal after a couple days. All these things, lead to a loss of routine – the lack of; home comforts, reliable work areas and exercise. That loss of routine can end up costing more than just your time. It can cost your company and team, a lot of time and money.

You see, when you lose your routine it throws you out of whack. Couple that with being in a subpar hotel room, eating out every meal and letting your activity levels slip, and you can fall into a funk for days, even weeks, after you return home.

Here’s what will help you stay sane and productive while traveling for work:

A comfortable apartment.

When traveling you need a place to feel at home, take a hot shower after a long day, and make breakfast without having to put on pants. Having a space to work on your laptop at home is also a necessity. Forget hotel rooms that make you feel like a tourist or stuffy corporate traveler. Relaxing in a comfortable, private space that feels like home does wonders for your morale while traveling.

A designated space for work & meetings.

You need a place to take calls, work on presentations and prep for meetings while traveling. It’s best this is a designated space to go to plug in and do what you’re there for – work. Hotel lobby’s and cafes have unreliable wifi and get loud and distracting. When you use a coworking or office space, you can get online and into your work, fast. Plus, they have call and meeting rooms so you can be distraction free and present for your important meetings.

Prioritize your health and fitness.

Whether you prefer to squeeze in a 15 minute HIIT workout, knock out some stress in a boxing class, or decompress in an hour of yoga, having somewhere to move while traveling is essential. Prioritizing your health and wellness, lead to a happier, more focused and more productive you. Booking fitness classes ahead of time area a proven way to commit to your exercise goals while traveling. By booking ahead you’ve already committed, so even if you don’t feel like working out, you know you’ll be thanking yourself after.

Gain some knowledge on the city before you go.

Don’t waste your time spending hours searching for neighborhoods, city info, restaurants etc while there or taking the touristy suggestions. Getting information on the city, as well as local recommendations before you go, mean you can spend more time enjoying and less time being unsatisfied. Having recommendations and helpful info curated by locals, also mean you can skip the touristy areas and opt for some seriously delicious – and lower priced – restaurants. Plus, knowing the currency, cultural information, if there’s Uber there or which cabs to take, and which neighborhoods to stay in, come in super handy before arriving.

Stay connected to your team.

Staying connected to your team while traveling is incredibly important. Being in a different city or time zone can pose as a challenge, however if you’re prepared it shouldn’t be an issue. If you’re looking for the best tools to stay connected while working remotely, we shared them here.

All these should help make your business travels significantly better. While the airport line ups and travel time can’t be reduced, these four things will save you a lot of time – and headaches – ensuring you’re putting your best foot forward for your work trip. Plus, with staying healthy and booking in advance, you might just have time to see some neat places in that city! At Behere, we know how important these are, which is why we take care of all of them, in one easy to use booking platform. The best part, it’s free to use and your travel manager can also sign up and monitor your trips.

Ready to book your next business trip? Head to Behere or choose your city below. Want to share with your travel manager, send them this link. If you don’t see the city you’re traveling to next, send us an email booking@gobehere.com.


meesen brownWritten by Meesen Brown, CEO of Behere.
Meesen is the cofounder and CEO of Behere. She’s an avid traveler, speaker, dual citizen, healthy snack lover and is always looking for ways to reduce her carbon footprint. She spends most her time in New York, Barcelona or Toronto.

This is How to Convince your Boss To Let You Work Remotely

Many of us would love to work remotely, but fear our bosses or employers won’t allow us to. Convincing them may seem like an uphill battle, so we’ve put together a list of benefits for both your boss and you, to make it a bit easier. Plus, we’ve also created a Letter for Your Boss for some ideas on how to start the conversation.

Here are some key benefits of remote work, to help you convince your boss to let you work remotely:

  1. Studies show that remote workers are 20% more productive

    • They also show that employees that work remotely are twice as likely to work 40+ hours a week on important tasks. This is because they appreciate the flexibility and want to show their dedication to the projects that really matter.
  2. Distributed employees mean big cost savings for companies

    • Office space is becoming more and more expensive, as are all the office supplies, lunches, equipment and events. What’s more, over 50% of professionals have left a company or considered leaving because their employer lacked flexibility.
  3.  Work flexibility equals more loyal employees

    • Higher loyalty means higher productivity, which ultimately leads to decreased turnover (and more savings for companies). Employees are appreciative to their employers for the flexibility thus, feel more aligned with their roles and the companies mission.
  4. Employees that work remotely are both healthier and happier

    • At a time when society is really highlighting and promoting heath, this is a key benefit for employers and employees. Healthier employees are also more productive employees. What’s more, studies have shown remote workers take less sick / personal days. On an average day, a one way commute is 30 mins, which is about the same time it takes people to run 2-3 miles – on a yearly basis, that’s thousands of extra miles run for you.
  5.  Remote workers feel inspired and refreshed by changing their environment

    • Being away from the office (and spending time in a new city), gives people a fresh perspectives, increases their creativity, provokes new ideas and leads to exciting new experiences. This ultimately gives employees a much needed kickstart for new projects, ideas or goals. Plus, it can create great networking opportunities.
  6. Better work-life integration

    • Working remotely gives employees time to accomplish tasks that otherwise get neglected, as well as gives them more time to spend time with loved ones, travel or enjoy hobbies. This also adds to employee moral, a more refreshed outlook and more dedicated, driven employees.

To ease your boss into the idea, we recommend suggesting to try remote working once a week and work up to a full month of remote work. This is especially effective after a super busy period at the office, as it enables you recharge out of the office, during a quieter period.

**If you’ve talked to your boss about the benefits, read the Letter to Your Boss and still are having no luck getting them to budge – check out our Resources page for websites to find remote work and helpful tips to get started freelancing.**


Once you’ve finalized remote work with your boss, we highly recommend you use the opportunity to travel. We started Behere in the top cities for remote workers, around the world, so you can work remotely, without headaches. Find out more about how Behere helps make it a seamless transition and book your next month abroad here.

This is How You Can Negotiate Flexible Work

Want to transition to remote work but unsure where to start?

This is a common question in today’s workforce. Flexible work policies are on the rise, but most organizations are still lacking them. Majority of employees, want more flexibility at work and many will consider leaving a role if it lacks flexibility. 

To help make remote work a reality for you, we’ve outlined our steps to asking for flexible work, and shared our resources. With countless studies and research on remote work indicating it makes employees more productive, creative and loyal, we know the benefits are worth it.

So, we put together tools and resources to help you feel prepared and confident in discussing it with your boss. This is the future of work – we want to help you get there.

Follow our steps below and use our tools for a well-informed discussion with your organization, about the future of work.

1. Research your company’s remote work, telecommuting and flexible work policies

By doing a quick check, you will know if your company already has policies in place (sometimes they exist but are not being utilized). If these policies already exist, it will make your conversation a bit easier, but if not, these resources will help.

2. Find out if other companies in your industry have flexible work policies

If companies in your industry already have flexible work policies, it may be easier to convince your organization to implement them as well. Information is important when presenting a new idea, the more you have, the better prepared you will be!

3. Schedule a meeting with your boss to go over it

It is important not to just spring this on your boss over their morning coffee or lunch. You can start the conversation by giving them this letter and then schedule a meeting (not during lunch), to go over the information and research you have on flexibility.

4. Be prepared – bring research & stats on the benefits of flexible work for your employer

Bringing proven studies and data on the benefits of flexible work, for both employers and employees, will really help your case. We have compiled some stats and research in an easy to understand, highlights-driven tool. Get the resource for free here.

Some of the research highlights include:

  • 91% of respondents are more productive when working remotely
  • Remote workers are 20% more productive
  • 82% of telecommuters report lower stress and better mental health, in addition to healthier and happier
  • Flexible employees accomplish 30% more in less time
  • Working remotely saves your company $11,000 yearly per employee
  • Flexibility creates more loyal employees – 85% of millennials want flexible work
  • Saved commute time – a 30 minute commute results in 20 wasted hours a month

5. Research tools that will keep you connected to the team and give your boss confidence in you

We put together a resource for this as well. There’s a list of tools for flexible/remote workers that can be found here. (Try using some services/platforms that are common practice in your office already)

6. Outline what remote working will look like for you

Make sure to explain how you will handle working remotely, while excelling in your role. This might include how you will adapt hours to fit your company hours, regardless of the time zone you are in.

7. Highlight that you will have high-speed wifi at your new, inspiring workspace

Absolutely crucial to getting your employer on board, is showing them you will be capable of producing quality work, from wherever you are. Through utilizing a platform like Behere, you will be able to seamlessly transition from the first day in your new city. Additionally your new coworking space, (with tested high-speed wifi!) will help you tap into your creativity.

8. Finally, offer a trial run

Make it clear that you are asking for flexible work options, not trying to jump right into being a full-time remote employee. Suggest a flexible working month, giving your employer and yourself the chance to test it out, to ensure it is the right fit.


At Behere, we’re passionate about making it easier for women to live and work from where they want. Nailed that flexible job and ready to live in your dream city? Get started below!